PPI’s Linked to Gastric Cancer

PPI’s Linked to Gastric Cancer

PPI’s, proton pump inhibitors, include drugs such as Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, Protonix, and Dexilent. These drugs help treat acid reflux and act to protect the stomach lining. Individuals can generally use these drugs safely for short periods of time, but scientific studies show a person’s long-term use significantly increases their risk of developing gastric (stomach) cancer. Doctors are often unaware of the damaging side effects that these drugs may have when prescribing them for their patients.

Gastric cancer ranks fifth among the most common types of cancer and third on the list for cancer-related deaths. Long-term use of PPI drugs, six to twelve months, more than doubles an individual’s normal risk of developing gastric cancer. Numerous recent studies published in 2017 and 2018 have confirmed this potentially deadly link of long-term PPI use to gastric cancer.  Also, studies show that individuals who take these drugs daily are four times more likely to develop gastric cancer versus those who take them only once a week.

Five possible treatment options are available for individuals diagnosed with gastric cancer. They include surgery (such as a subtotal or total gastrectomy), chemotherapy, radiation, chemoradiation, and targeted therapy. Surgery offers individuals a viable treatment option for any stage of gastric cancer.  A subtotal gastrectomy will remove the portion of the stomach where the cancer is located, the lymph nodes, and other tissues and organs surrounding the tumor, as well as the spleen. A total gastrectomy involves the complete removal of the stomach, surrounding lymph nodes, portions of the esophagus, the small intestines, and usually the spleen as well.  Chemotherapy can be administered for all stages, although the severity of cancer will dictate the intensity of the treatment. Doctors commonly use external radiation gastric cancer, a treatment which involves a machine that transmits the radiation to the cancer. Chemoradiation combines both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. It can occur prior to surgery to help downsize the tumor, or after surgery to decrease the chance of the cancer returning. Targeted therapy focuses on destroying just the cancer-related cells, not the surrounding healthy cells.

If you or a loved one has endured pain and suffering after taking a Proton Pump Inhibitor and developing gastric cancer, call the Yost Legal Group to inquire about how we may be able to assist you. Our team of experienced attorneys will provide you with a free initial consultation and will help you get the justice that you deserve. Give us a call today at 1-800-YOST-LAW.